Links

Links

Below are links to organizations, resources, and interesting things that supported my research for Covered Bridges of New Hampshire.

National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges

Founded in 1950, the National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges (NSPCB) provides national advocacy for the preservation of covered bridges and, maintains the largest repository of historical archival material related to covered bridges, past and present.

New Hampshire Covered Bridges List

A thorough and updated listing of every covered bridge in the state, including number, location, length, year built, truss type, and GPS coordinates, as well as a link to photos.

New Hampshire Covered Bridges: A Link With Our Past

The 1991 New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) publication outlining the state numbered covered bridges. Compiled by Richard G. Marshall, Chief of Systems Planning, this book was the first to offer historical details on the 54 covered bridges in the state.

National Covered Bridges Recording Project: HAER

Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) has surveyed over 100 covered bridges as part of the National Covered Bridges Recording Project. The archival documentation produced for these surveys is housed at the Library of Congress in the HAER Collection.

Guidelines

Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Covered Bridges

In 2019, HAER produced the Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Covered Bridges. Edited by Christopher H. Marston, HAER Architect, and Thomas A. Vitanza, Senior Historical Architect, NPS Historic Preservation Training Center (HPTC), this publication provides specific guidelines for the rehabilitation of covered bridges. Click on the link for a PDF or to order a paper copy.

Covered Bridges and the Birth of American Engineering

Covered Bridges and the Birth of American Engineering (2015), edited by HAER Historian Justine Christianson and HAER Architect Christopher H. Marston, “examines the development of wood trusses and covered bridge construction, profiles the pioneering craftsmen and engineers involved, explores the function of trusses in covered bridges, and looks at the preservation and future of these distinctly American bridges.” Click on the link for a PDF or to order a paper copy.

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